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of students with specific goals and general education and our diverse learners that benefit as you can understand from teachers with a repertoire of strategies. in gathering this general data we have contracted with pearson's review 360 and a screening tool that makes it easier to input aggregate behavioral student trends. i want to emphasize for the community that this universal screening is not a test or evaluation of students or pupils, but rather it's a teacher survey to collect teacher's observations of people's behavior. all of the information that is collected has been directly observed by families doing their daily responsibilities to manage student behavior. the survey doesn't require teachers to do psychological testing or any mental health assessments as stated in the letter. please note above that the universal screening data would be used to determine if there are enhancements needed to support students in school or what supplemental or methods are necessary. i also want to call everyone's attention this is mendoza and we have joining our president and celebrating ja
with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obligations and starting with the adults and i go back to the adults because the adults really have to tow the line here. they really have to walk the talk. i cannot tell you how often i of involved in large mentoring efforts and now in two different places, in l.a. and arizona. i cannot tell you how often the teachers are the ones that set the tone whether we have a respectable environment or and
.s. education system is slipping down the global rankings. we talked to one woman with radical ideas for an overhaul. life like robotic patients are used by doctors and nurses in the uk who want to practice their clinical skills. they suffer from a range of problems like asthma and severe infections. >> john is sick. he has been in a car crash and he is struggling to breathe. these doctors are trying to figure out what to do. if they cannot, no one dies. these robots are different. they are controlled to react to treatment second by second. "although we are taught in books what to do in certain situations, is very different when you have equipment, and you have people talking to you. run through.way to >> there are other members of the family. he can heartbeat -- he can have a heartbeat and describe the symptoms. it is cutting edge technology. it's not the only new technology here. the robots are on patrol. they're setting up and delivering the tea and coffee. they also are sorting the mail and they have revolutionized the policy. >> one of the first things we are achieving this that
amount of the public education enrichment fund that in the district materials that would be transmitted to the city, the mayor and the board of supervisors and the other city officials, that we would specify that -- we would make some sort of a statement that we would -- we expect full funding or appropriation from the city for 13-14 -- i actually haven't shared with this chris and kathy and part of that why is so because in the mayor's state of the city address yesterday he remarked about his intention to fully fund the public education enrichment fund and specified the amounts of funding that would be associated with the appropriation for 13-14 and i confirmed with the mayor's budget director one-on-one just to make sure we were crystal clear about the intention. that that was the right interpretation and she confirmed it was so and we could share that information with our board members and stakeholders which is why you all received the email that you did this morning from dr. crawford, so based on that commissioner wynns i see your point that it may still be good to memorialize that
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
with an organization called national school choice week. she runs the education break through network. she's a big believer of education reform. her mantra is that your zip code should not determine your destiny. when you have a party who truly believes that every american has a shot at the the american dream that's who we want running the republican and democratic parties. >> jennifer: that's a name we should be watching for. >> absolutely. >> jennifer: i'm going to switch because you just wrote a column relative to this, and i want to ask you about it. we learned this week that there was an alabama high school football coach who was suspended after making derogatory remarks about michelle obama's posterio posterior, actually. why is it that people think it's fair game to talk about our first lady's anatomy. >> it is something that i don't understand. people spoke about hillary clinton when she was running for office and when she was first lady. one of the things that seems to be a little bit different here with regard to people talking about the high school coach that you talked about referred t
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particularly marginaliz
to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message outside of the school into the media, into the communities, into families so that people kind of understand this process of another way of learning and becoming an educated person. a couple of other things i do i work with anne on the board and with the foundation. that has been exciting. i do advising for sesame street. if you have small children the next seafn sesame street you will see some of the favorite characters and breathing and learning problem solving models and we're very excited -- >> [inaudible] >> and they're focusing on self regulation and other skills and specific focus and exciting working with them the past year and a half or so so i want people to have a look here, and what i would like to do is tie some of the things together that you have been hearing about today and in terms of bullying prevention, other prevention work going on in your state and in terms of promoting positive behaviors with youth, and so sometimes
a member of the bcc as well. >> [speaking spanish] >> she's our [inaudible] to you with the education on board. >> [speaking spanish] >> she's providing report to the board members. >> [speaking spanish] >> and generally we're going to decide what we're going to focus on in 2012-2013. >> [speaking spanish] >> observations that we're going to include in that report if we can are our observations regarding enrollment. >> [speaking spanish] >> thank you. >> well, superintendent carranza and board of education commissioners as you can see in our report we have a lot to celebrate and a lot of successes we have made. i am very happy to say great progress in how we are providing services for el students and families, so i think there's a lot to be -- a lot to appreciate and be thankful for. we do believe like we said in the beginning part of our report that we are working much more effectively together with san francisco unified leadership and are grateful for that and my portion of the report are the concerns that we condition to -- continue to have in the bcc and in reviewing the letter
in on a regular basis and other educational efforts campaign efforts to alert our public to the issues that are or that occur in those lines. >> thank you. >> supervisor mar? >> yeah, i just wanted to say that given the time data on the robberies, it seems that it is right after school gets out, and i am just wondering if there is any age data on the victims? are they students that are just getting off of school? or and also the perpetrators any age data? >> i do not have any age data here, our crime analyst unit i suspect will be able to draw that data based upon what is entered into or systems from the incident reports written. the age, the demographics of the victims as well as the suspects but it is not something that i prepared for today. >> just to give you aggregate numbers, covering october, november, december. this is just the three-month combined summary. these numbers are what the crime analysts are assigned to the muni detail gather through actually pulling every single report on a daily basis and anything on the line or nearby this is a result of that analysis. and so you
is assassinated in front of his home. >> the german education minister is stripped of her document for playing it -- her doctorate for plagiarism, and the opposition calls for her resignation. >> the political crisis in tunisian deepened dramatically tonight following the assassination of a top opposition leader and the violent unrest that has followed in the wake of his killing. troops have been deployed in a number of locations to restore order. >> the killing of the prominent secular politician has sparked protests across the country. supporters flooded the streets of tunis and other cities. there are reports of barricades being erected in clashes with police. >> news of the assassination sparked protests in several tunisian cities. in the capital, thousands of angry protesters followed the ambulance carrying belaid's body. many blame the islamists, an accusation the party denies. >> people know that the criminals are directly linked to the head of the party. >> all these islamist organizations of terrorist grou. history is a witness. it is not possible to discuss, negotiate, or agree with
bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i belie
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
with our parents and share what our children are learning. >> she represents a new generation of educators that values social media. anne arundel county is about to get on board systemwide. they are drawing up a social media policy to enhance education and learning. >> we will use social media for instructional purposes. if the teacher finds a youtube video, we could unblock youtube. they could use it in the lesson. they currently cannot do that. >> educators will create a high- tech path for learning. social media has already gotten a past. >> i see so many opportunities to connect with classrooms across the country and the world. if opens up so many doors for my students. >> these social media policy will not go on the books without language to protect students. it will draw the line on how students and educators communicate, but they're also be exceptions in cases where administrators and parents have given written permission. this is the first reading of the social media policy. if approved by the school board, it would go on the books this fall. we have a draft of that proposal on our
what was important in life. education being the primary importance and if i heard once i must have heard everyday in my childhood education opens the door of opportunity for you. it took me a while to realize that that's not the only thing it does for you. it also enriches you as a person. but she also taught me what i think the most important thing and that's to be caring about people. now, my mom didn't understand public service in the way that i've participated in it. sort of didn't lead community boards or lead -- >> rose: she probably didn't have time! >> she didn't. she was raising two kids and working six days a week and trying to survive. but she showed me what it meant to care about people. i detail in the book how my mother was a local nurse to the projects in the co-op city where we lived, how giving she was to everyone she's met. and i learned from her example that that was an important value in life to give to others. >> rose: did you also learn in your experience that you cannot do it alone? >> oh, gosh, that's what the whole book is about. it's how i stand on the sho
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
, that education, job training, paying attention to housing, poverty, isolation, all of those elements lead to the uptick in violence. that's actually quite a strong lesson for all of us mayors to learn as we ask each other for help in solving this. and i want to thank all of you in this audience from adult probation, juvie probation, inter98 (inaudible) for helping me carve what we can do in this city. many of you know i've been a champion for jobs and i truly believe job creation and better economics is going to be a big answer. but it isn't the only answer because i quickly realized, i can't give a dead kid a job in this city. there's no answer for that. we've got to find better answers for people who are confronted with decisions they have to make to not take the violent road for that decision. and it starts early and many of you reminded me, start now, mayor, start investing in education. start investing in community based ways in which we can reduce the attitude that violence can resolve something. and then make sure we work with our health departments and our medical experts to
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
budget which means it takes money away from other areas like education infrastructure and other health service needs. medicaid and the need to have flexibility is going to be certainly something we will watch as we go forward. let me finish by ending where i started. we need to address the rising cost of health health health ca. i don't think the affordable care act does that. i think we have provided an opportunity with their health care exchange and utah that allows businesses to contain to provide benefits and help with competitive forces and consumer control to in fact have an impact on the rising cost of health care. it may be imperfect but it's a step i think in the right direction. again the fundamental position that i'm taking and we are taking in utah is the free market works if we will allow it. it takes politicians like himself and others out there to be disciplined and to give time for the marketplace to work. we sometimes are so i just a problem that we don't look at making adjustments that are necessary to get the right outcome. and as i said, if we want the best quality
for the civillyctionver advertise public education program. so, i think she brings a really diverse amount of knowledge with her in terms of communities around california which can be applied here in san francisco, having granted, i don't know, how many millions of dollars to programs that benefited ethnic minority communities throughout the state of california. also, she is currently one of the representatives from the historic preservation commission to a joint committee appointed by the planning commission and the hpc to find a new secretary for both commissions. so, she's been the co-chair of that committee and they are now entering into the final phases of the search for a new secretary, and i think it would be appropriate to continue to have her on the historic preservation commission so she can continue her work there. also, lastly, she is also the executive director for the berg en foundation. i think she's the only person that can stand toe to toe with mr. burton. not head to head, maybe, but toe to toe, and she can swear as much as he can. but she is actually very civil in public hearings, a
economic opportunities to women and girls, rooted in education and business and investment are not going to be as prosperous as they might otherwise be. so it became clear that if i was going to be traveling around talking about diplomacy and development, urging changes in economic structures, introducing what we call economic statecraft to be a central pillar of our foreign policy you had to talk about women and girls and so i've tried to do that. >> restrictions on women's economic participation are costing us massive amounts of economic growth and income in every region of the world. >> this work, ensuring that women are equal partners, as they should be, and are free to realize their own god-given potential, was one of the great pieces of unfinished business of the 21st century. with this equal futures partnership, we are taking an important step toward trying to finish that business. through this initiative, governments from around the world are making concrete commitments to support women in two key areas -- political participation and economic opportunity. >> have you gotten any g
'm grateful for his education and there is no comparison between the quality of this man and chuck hagel. they are in different sandboxes. i'm very grateful for people like this who we desperately need in times like this. >> we go to the independent line. this is doug, welcome to the conversation. caller: thanks for taking my call and thanks to c-span. i think the only one that had any sanity and knew the questions that were going to be asked. we did not get any answers to them. how is the decision made? what are the requirements? the independent said we should have a court that regardless who the president is they should not have a unilateral way to document nominate someone. people in this country don't know about the mddaa, the national defense thorgs act which allows the president to designate a person who he feels is a terrorist or supporting terrorist organizations to deprive him of life, liberty and not be able to go in front of a court. you can't say listen, you have the wrong person. we can be unilaterally detained. there is no question about, for instance, the propaganda guy th
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
mailers in march, next month, and will be conducting a number of educational efforts to make sure we reach all business customers. as we get closer to the delivery scheduled change in in august, we will be publishing information in post offices, putting it online and other customer contact to make sure our residential customers know. let me conclude with a couple of thoughts. this announcement today is just one part of a much larger strategy to return the postal service to long-term financial stability. the plans saves $2 billion annually, that we have a $20 billion gap to close. we are striving to raise revenues, reduce costs and gain efficiencies throughout the entire organization and making this change to our delivery schedule is a big-ticket item and simply too big of a cost savings to ignore. in fact, i would strongly argue it would be irresponsible for the postal service not to pursue this course. second, we are implementing this approach to improve our overall business performance. there is a strong and growing demand for our package service and we need to meet that over the coming
in december which will lead an interagency effort that would fund an intensive public engagement and education program, and for the first time to have a park and first trees, it will be the capital allocation. and then lastly, as i mentioned, the department anticipates requesting from the preservation fund commission 250 thousand dollars to fund the work on the local interpretation to have secretary to have interior guide book, this guide book, it's not specific to local conditions, regarding the infill development in historic districts this accidenter will appropriate staff to develop [inaudible] resulting in a clear guiding document for the application of these standards citywide. so, here's an update on the budget calendar, we've come to you with a draft work program, budget application like we did with the historic preservation, today i'm presenting a draft. next wednesday, i will be going before the historic preservation commission asking for their recommendation of approval and in two weeks from today, i will be coming to this body asking for your approval of the department's budget bef
, and social media is there means of education. abc asked us to get on with your as soon as the show came out. -- to get on twitter as soon as it came out. i thought, it really gets on my nerves. i am not doing that. they said, we want you to. i knew that i was behind the times, so i thought, why don't we check it out? i was really uncomfortable at first, and within a short time i was stunned by the scope and power of it. we do this thing where we do live tweets during an episode, so the cast will get on a stretcher, and we communicate in real time with our fans -- will get on twitter, and we communicate in real time with our fans. tavis: you know what trending is now. >> the first time i tweeted, i was terrified. i thought, what button? then you get the hang of it, and now it is fun. i tweet with regularity and thousands of people, for some of insane reason, are interested. you learn how to communicate, and it is extraordinary, and kerry washington is a master at it. the other actor is way ahead of the curve. it has been a big engine for us. tavis: you are playing the president, but you have
to provide them with an opportunity to correct their behavior and move on so they can get education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track
of the public education reason rich ment fund community advisory community. superintendent. all right. it's not time for general public comment now. >> [inaudible] >> sir, sir. >> [inaudible] there was a vice principal that touched a child inappropriately -- [inaudible] >> sir --sir, i don't want to clear the room. you're out of order. >> yeah -- let's. >> this is inappropriate. you need to sit down sir. >> sir. >> you need to sit down sir. >> my name is charles e smith pastor. >> all right. i am clearing the room. please leave the >> good fortune of spending at least one night a month with the members to work on looking at it and how it's serving our students and help to make it a more impactful initiative so each year we take time to recognize each member of the peace cap and first we want to start with folks terming down after four years of services and i wanted to remind commissioners that we do have some vacancy and i will send you information so we can fill the seats and keep our positive momentum going. i'm want sure if all these folks are here but wanted to recognize them but
funding for crossroads cafe was provided in part... by the dartments of education of the states of... california florida, illinois... and new york and by the united states department of education... and the united states immigration & naturalization service. listen to this: "crime up 12 percent." "ten die in hurricane." it's no wonder people feel depressed. - maybe you shouldn't read the newspaper every day. - ust read the comics. - here. - for the police officers at that table. - they don't look like policemen. - detectives. i met them here last week. i just wanted to welcome them to the neighborhood. good idea. when is that due by ? wednesday, i think. wednesday ? here you go. i'm sorry, we didn't order this. they're from mr. brashov. rosa's famous coffee cake, on the house. that's very nice of you, but i'm afraid we can't accept it. oh, please, i insist. sorry, it's against department policy. oh. i can understand that. put it on our bill. i think my partner hasn't eaten in about a month. as you wish. i hope you will visit us often. mmm. you've got
these crimes and educating the public on how we can all, protect ourselves understanding that the police cannot be everywhere at the same time. >> we will have several speakers that will provide us with information about the state of the world in this particular area and what we are doing to address the problem. we have representatives from the police department, district attorney office, and from the mta. we did, anticipate that the ctia, wireless association would be able to attend unfortunately at the last minute there was an aunavoidable conflict and not able to be here today. i do know that both the police department and the da's office continued to work very closely with wireless carriers to coordinate and to see what we can do to make these targets or to make these phones and these tablets less appealing targets and i know that there has been a lot of talk about bricking, and finding ways for the phones to actually just be killed remotely. so that they don't have any value. i am sure that we will hear about that today. so colleagues, if there is no introduction comments, mr. chairman? >>
erative agreement with the u.s. department of education. (school bell rings) kids: school! (pants, barks) kid: word world! kids: word world! ♪ welcome to the place where words come alive ♪ kid: let's build a word. kids: word world. kid: word world. kids: ♪ jump to the beat ♪ clap your hands in the air ♪ kids: let's build a word! word world! kid: word world. ♪ we've got friends of every size ♪ ♪ building words before our eyes ♪ ♪ nothing's better than a letter ♪ ♪ they hold our world together ♪ ♪ with dog ♪ and sheep ♪ and duck ♪ and pig ♪ there's always a surprise! ♪ (barks) kids: word world! (croaks) (whimpers) (giggles) ♪ welcome to our world kids: word world! ♪ word world ♪ kids: word world! ♪ it's a beautiful world ♪ word world. ♪ kids: yay! narrator: one fine morning in word world, the sound of music filled the air. (lively music playing) i love to listen to music while i work. narrator: uh, what are you doing, frog? oh, hi, mr. narrator. i'm fixing my doorbell. (gentle music playing) b... e... l... l. (bells chiming softly) (
the department of education and homeland security joined forces to discuss increased efforts to discuss human trafficking and child exploitation. and according to the national cent for missing and exploited children, at least 100,000 children across the country are sexually exploited each year and 46% forced into prostitution. the research shows one in five girls and one in continue boys will be sexually victimized before adulthood. the obama administration made efforts to combat human trafficking and joining us is the director of the u.s. department of education office of safe and healthy students. thank you for coming in. >> thank you for inviting me. >> and one in 25 girls, that signs high. how do you define this january ray of exploitation? >> that exploitation takes many forms, including child pornography and human trafficking and into prostitution. it's a significant problem. >> and how does human trafficking affect schools? >> in a number of ways. it affects the girls and boys directly trafficked and it has a negative impact on the school climate. >> and how would someone who is watchi
got the milk and educator award, sometimes called the academy award of teaching. >> since i was little, i have always wanted to teach. i would take my sisters and we would play school. i always wanted to teach, that's all i know. >> and you are doing it well. colleagues credit sims with bringing innovative ideas to the classroom and focusing on the success of each and every student. it comes with $25,000 and an invitation to join a nationwide panel who work served as a research for educators. >> sunny, not so cold, but we know that's not going to last this time of year. topper is out on the weather terrace, some rain in the future? >> we're in good shape tonight and tomorrow, if you head out tonight, on the chilly side. i would recommend a jacket. it's 40 downtown, but in some cases, mid 30s in the suburbs. 34 in gaithersburg. 36 in leesburg. 37 in manassas. 39 in fairfax. and 39 in la plata. so for tonight, we'll stay clear to partly cloudy, some clouds return by dawn. lows 24 to 32. winds will come down and turn northeasterly at 10. we'll come back and talk about this n
percent gone and it's done. you can get youu education. gooe. write it off. modeling possibly pick up."old him that - crosby says he ádoes hope to pick crosby says hee ádoess ope to pick the modeling back up... once he to ytas... toss 3 the contract f one raven legend has expired,,is ed reed taking off for greennr pastuues?ozzie newsooe weighs in, ext in sports... with thh seeson now commlete, and i do interior decorating and styling for bars and restaurants. [ male announcer ] whenever a business switches from cable to verizon fios, there comes a moment when they get it -- the powerful difference 100% fiber optics really makes. i got it the first time i uploaded these massive design plans. it was kind of mind-blowing because it happened so fast. [ male announcer ] now do more business per second with the speed and reliability of verizon fios for business. get internet and phone for just $94.99 a month when you sign up online with a two-year price guarantee. plus, get a $200 verizon visa pre-paid card. verizon. verizon visa pre-paid card. witt a second lombarditrop
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